GO Proudly Presents: 100 Women We Love, Class Of 2020

Austin Quinn-Davidson

Photo Courtesy of Austin Quinn-Davidson.

Anchorage Assembly member Austin Quinn-Davidson decided to go to law school when she realized that lawmakers have the “power to lift up those who are disadvantaged (or not) and power to shape the future of our communities.” Quinn-Davidson grew up in a small, rural town in a low-income family, but in law school, she realized most of her fellow students were from wealthy backgrounds — which shaped their experiences and priorities. She came to understand that if members of affluent backgrounds are responsible for creating laws that impact everyone, the outcome is not likely to reflect the reality of the broader community. “We need diverse representation in elected office so that all of our backgrounds and experiences are honored,” she says. “I’m proud to serve as an elected official, and especially proud to bring another perspective to the table.” Now, in her position with the Anchorage assembly, Quinn-Davidson strives to better serve vulnerable local communities. Since taking office in 2018, the assemblywoman has supported Native partners in their work to better identify murdered, missing indigenous women (MMIW) as well as Anchorage’s Climate Action Plan — the strongest climate change plan in Alaska. When an earthquake struck, Quinn-Davidson worked with Alaska’s federal delegation to change FEMA guidelines, making more homeowners eligible for disaster relief. She is committed to drug and alcohol reforms to better support her community, co-sponsoring a city-wide alcohol sales tax that will generate revenue to fund social programs related to public safety, homelessness, and Pre-K programs for Title 1 schools. “The most rewarding aspect of my work is the ability to make positive change that affects my community in a tangible way,” Quinn-Davidson says. “I love that I get to incorporate a vision for the future into what I do every day.” —IL


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