Everything You Need to Know About the Women’s March on Washington

A massive rally inspired by the aftermath of the current election and planned around the inauguration of Donald Trump, the Women’s March is a demonstration of centering women, prioritizing the needs and wants of women, keeping mindful of intersectionality and inclusivity.

Thousands of women will be heading to D.C. on Saturday for the Women’s March on Washington. A massive rally inspired by the aftermath of the current election and planned around the inauguration of Donald Trump, the Women’s March is a demonstration of centering women, prioritizing the needs and wants of women, keeping mindful of intersectionality and inclusivity. From the founders’ Unity Principles:

“We believe that Women’s Rights are Human Rights and Human Rights are Women’s Rights. We must create a society in which women – including Black women, Native women, poor women, immigrant women, disabled women, Muslim women, lesbian queer and trans women – are free and able to care for and nurture their families, however they are formed, in safe and healthy environments free from structural impediments.”

If you’re heading to the Women’s March on Washington this weekend, here are some need-to-knows.

When: January 21, 2017, 10 a.m. is the official start time, but activities begin at 8 a.m. with pre-rally speakers, performances and PSAs kicking off at 9. The march will begin at  1:15 p.m., marching west on Independence Avenue SW, from 3rd Street SW, to 14th Street SW; turn north on 14th Street SW to Constitution Avenue NW; march west on Constitution Avenue NW to 17th Street NW, near the Ellipse and Washington Monument. 

Where: The march starting point will be the intersection of Independence Avenue and Third Street SW, near the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. The rally stage is on 3rd Street and Independence Avenue by the National Museum of the American Indian.

If you have yet to register, you should do so now. Organizers are trying to get a headcount and will also be taking some data of those in attendance, so anything provided ahead of time will be helpful to their cause and can help them better plan enough bathrooms and food trucks.

Pre-plan your drop point. That includes registering your bus if you’re taking one and it hasn’t been registered already. Buses will be required to park and will not be dropping marchers off at the event (unless you have made special prior accommodations).  There is no parking available for personal cars, so it’s advised that you bike and park your bikes in the designated area (they are not allowed in the March) or take the Metro. (The closest Metro stations are Federal Center SW and L’Enfant Plaza to the south and Judiciary Square to the north.) However you’re getting there, make sure to give yourself plenty of extra travel time, as things will surely be a little slower and more congested than usual.

The march won’t begin right at 10 a.m., but the rally will. Performers include 

Janelle Monáe, The Indigo Girls Angelique Kidjo, Toshi Reagon, Samantha Ronson, Emily Wells, DJ Rekha, MC Lyte, St. Beauty, Beverly Bond, Alia Sharief, DJ Rimarkable, Amber Coffman, the Indigo Girls, Mary Chapin Carpenter,  Climbing PoeTree and Maxwell. There are also several musicians, actors and other public figures who are part of the Artists Table who will be in attendance, and the speakers list is also full of activists, writers and politicians who will address the crowd (like Gloria Steinem, Janet Mock and Melissa Harris-Perry, to name a few.) 

Pack light. It’s important to know that the only backpacks allowed are those that are clear and smaller than 17″x12″x6″ (one per person), and all other bags/totes/purses for small personal items should be no larger than 8”x6”x4”. Marchers are additionally one other  12”x12”x6” plastic or gallon bag, ideally for snacks, lunch or water. You’re allowed to bring signs and flags but no poles or wooden sign posts.

Dress warm and comfortable for walking in the cold January weather. There will be limited seating so plan to stand or sit on the ground. Portable bathrooms will be available on the march route with hired security officers and marshalls helping to keep things safe and streamlined. 

Connect with the March and other Marchers. The March has a free app available as well as a presence on most social platforms. Organizers encourage the use of #WomensMarch, #WhyIMarch and #IMarchFor and tagging them using the handle @womensmarch.

Can’t make it to D.C.? Head to your closest sister march. There are more than 600 planned around the world, all listed on the official Women’s March website. You can also make a donation to the cause or buy some merch in support.

Read additional GO coverage of the Women’s March on Washington here:

How LGBTQ Women Will “Represent” at the Women’s March on Washington and Sister Cities

Why This Bisexual Asian Woman is Marching