Join Us Today for #Time4BlackTransWomen Moment of Silence at Noon PT/3pm ET

We mourn their deaths.

Londonn Moore Kinard, a 20-year-old Black trans woman, was murdered earlier this week in North Port, Florida — she was the twentieth trans person murdered in 2018, that we know of. Of those twenty murders, fourteen of them were Black trans women. We mourn their deaths.

This is an epidemic. If you can’t see that, you aren’t paying attention. In response to this, the Transgender Law Center is calling for a national moment of silence today at noon PT/3pm ET. The staff at GO Mag will be joining them, and we invite you to, as well.

The following statement was released by Isa Noyola, deputy director of Transgender Law Center:

“We are heartbroken and furious at the murder of four young Black trans women in these past two weeks. Each of these deaths is an unspeakable loss of a beautiful, loved young Black woman, and together their murders mark a heightened moment of crisis for our community.

Now – not just when the President tweets or a legislator pushes harmful policy – is the moment we need allies of trans women to mobilize. Now is yet another moment we need our media to pay attention, look at the systemic problems contributing to this crisis, and finally hold each other accountable for offensive, dehumanizing coverage of these deaths. Now is the moment when non-Black trans women, like myself, must recommit ourselves to lifting up the work of Black trans women and confronting all the ways our country, founded on anti-Blackness, is killing our Black trans sisters.

We’re asking folks to show up and show out for Black trans women this Friday. Wherever you are on Friday at noon PT/3pm ET, go outside, take up space with your friends, loved ones, schoolmates, and coworkers, say the names of the lives we’ve lost, and honor those still here in a moment of solidarity and public display of the crisis we’re in. Beyond that moment, check in with Black trans organizers in your communities and ask what support looks like.

The only way through the fear that consumes us at these times is hope. The only way to build hope is through community.

It’s been a devastating few years, and particularly since Trump came to office, we have not known a day without crisis. Yes, we’re exhausted. But amid all these crises, we’ve continued to fight, to rally, and to mobilize. We can’t allow the deaths of Black trans women to be the moment we fail to show up.”

It’s not enough to speak about the lives of Black trans women after they’ve been murdered — cis people need to be allies and advocates every single day. That means checking in on your friends who are trans. That means donating to fundraisers for gender-affirming surgeries or housing needs of trans women. That means celebrating the lives of trans women who are doing incredible work. That means calling someone in when you hear them say something transphobic or racist — and inviting them to do the work in unlearning these violent beliefs.

I hope you will join us today in this moment of silence. I hope you will join us every day going forward for standing up for the lives of our trans siblings.

As we continue to fight for the rights, equality, and lives of transgender people, we honor those we’ve lost.

Christa Leigh Steele-Knudslien42, was found dead in her home on January 5 in North Adams, Massachusetts. Steele-Knudslien organized and produced the Miss Trans New England and other pageants, and was loved and known by many in both the local and national trans community.

Viccky Gutierrez, 33, a transgender woman from Honduras was stabbed and had her body set ablaze inside her Los Angeles home on January 10. Friends described her as “a young trans Latina immigrant woman whose warm smile would give anyone comfort.”

Tonya Harvey35, was fatally shot on February 6 in Buffalo, New York. A friend of Harvey’s expressed her condolences on Facebook, writing: “I knew her since I started transitioning, she was so sweet and loving.” Police have confirmed that they are looking into the incident as a possible hate crime.

Celine Walker, 36, was fatally shot in a hotel room on February 4 in Jacksonville, Florida. It was not known for several days that Walker was trans because local police claimed not to refer to victims as transgender. Investigators are still looking for a suspect in her death.

Phylicia Mitchell, 45, was shot and killed outside her home on February 23 in Cleveland, Ohio. On April 10, Cleveland.com reported that a warrant has been issued for the arrest of Gary Sanders. Sanders was charged with aggravated murder in Mitchell’s death. Her longtime partner, Shane Mitchell, described her as “funny and kind” and that “everyone loved her.”

Zakaria Fry, 28, went missing in New Mexico in mid-January. Her body was later found 40 miles outside of Albuquerque on February 19. Albuquerque Police arrested and charged Charles Spiess with two open counts of murder. Fry’s loved ones shared condolences on Facebook with one friend saying: “You were my older sister. You took care of me and loved me like family. I’ll forever love you. I’m sorry.”

Amia Tyrae Berryman, 28, was fatally shot at a local motel on March 26 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Few details are known about the crime, and police report they have no suspects or persons of interest at this time.

Sasha Wall, 29, a transgender woman of color, was fatally shot on April 1 in Chesterfield County, South Carolina. The FBI is assisting with local investigators, and are analyzing phone records and collecting DNA evidence. Donovan Dunlap, a friend of Wall’s, expressed condolences on Facebook, writing, “I will miss you, my beautiful sister. I cannot sleep, I hope they find who did this.”

Karla Patricia Flores-Pavón, 26, was found choked to death in her apartment in Dallas, Texas, on May 9. Dallas Police arrested 24-year-old Jimmy Eugene Johnson III on May 17, charging him with Flores-Pavón’s murder. “It hurts a lot, you were a good-hearted person. Sister, fly high. We will remember you with love. Your beautiful smile will stay with us,” a friend posted on her Facebook page.

Nino Fortson, 36, was fatally shot in Atlanta on May 13. City police were nearby executing a traffic stop and rushed to the scene, but Forston later died at the hospital, said transgender advocate Monica Roberts.

Gigi Pierce, 28, was fatally shot on May 21 in Portland, Oregon. When officers arrived they tried to administer aid, but Pierce died at the scene. Police investigators say they believe that Pierce was shot during an altercation with Sophia Adler, who has been charged with Pierce’s murder, according to KGW-TV.

Antash’a English, 38, was fatally injured in drive-by shooting in Jacksonville, Florida on June 1. On her Facebook page, English described herself as an “independent” transgender woman who “thrives on being the best person” she can be. The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office has declared an active murder investigation and asks anyone with information to contact their office.

Cathalina Christina James, 24, was fatally shot in Jacksonville, Florida, on June 24. In an interview with First Coast News, James’ mother described her daughter as having a “big and bold” personality, saying she loved to dance and travel. James is the third transgender woman murdered and the fourth shot in the Florida city this year.

Keisha Wells, 58, was found dead with a gunshot wound to her abdomen in the parking lot of an apartment complex on June 24, according to Cleveland.com. A longtime friend of Wells described her as “the nicest person ever” but also a “tough cookie.”

Sasha Garden27, was found dead with signs of trauma in Orlando, Florida, early July 19. Originally from Wisconsin, Garden is remembered by loved ones as a “firecracker” who “didn’t hold anything back.” Friend and local transgender activist Mulan Montrese Williams recalls that Garden was a talented and aspiring hair stylist and had been saving money to fund her transition.

Diamond Stephens, 39, was found shot to death on June 18 in Meridian, Mississippi. In interviews with a local television station, family members said that Stephens had an “incredible personality.” As is too often the case in the reporting of anti-transgender violence, Stephens was originally misgendered in local police statements and media reports, which delayed our awareness of this deadly incident.

Vontashia Bell, 18, was fatally shot on August 30 in a neighborhood of Shreveport, Lousiana. The Louisiana Trans Advocates organization released a statement condemning the shooting and calling on the city’s leaders to help curb the violence against the trans community.

Dejanay Stanton, 24, was found with a fatal gunshot wound to the head on August 30, according to media reports. After an autopsy, her death was ruled a homicide and the investigation is ongoing. “Every time you saw her she had a smile on her face,” said LaSaia Wade, executive director of Brave Space Alliance. “She was just trying to live her best life as a young girl.”

Shantee Tucker30, was found with a fatal gunshot wound in the back in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on Sept. 5. Friends and family honored her life and mourned her death on Facebook, recalling that she was like “another big sister” to them and remembering her “beautiful spirit and fun aura.”

Londonn Moore20, was found dead of multiple gunshot wounds in a remote area of North Port, Florida on Sept. 8. Moore is remembered by her family and other loved ones, who described her as “hilarious” and someone who “made everyone laugh all the time.”

The above list comes reported from the Human Rights Campaign.